Gaknulak the Trapmaker

November 25, 2012

Gaknulak is one of the few goblinkin deities with a primarily constructive aspect, being the kobold god of invention, traps, and protective construction. He is reluctantly subservient to Kurtulmak, and is frequently dragged into Steelscales’ ill-fated plots against the Gnomish gods. Enjoy!

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Dakarnok the Raider

September 10, 2012

The small kobold pantheon is filled with a number of local deified heroes and minor gods, few of which are genuine powers. Of those that have, Dakarnok is by far the most powerful and widely known. He has become the deity of kobold warriors, focusing on destruction and plunder.

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Kuraulyek the Horned Thief

July 15, 2012

One of the more isolated goblinkin deities, Kuraulyek the Horned Thief is an exile from the kobold pantheon. He is a petty and paranoid god, who created the urd race as a rival to Kurtulmak’s kobolds, but they have not the power or the courage to truly challenge them. This was another interesting deity to work on, considering how little-used urds are. Hopefully I’ve come up with some ideas that make them more interesting to use!

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Kurtulmak the Cunning

May 28, 2011

Sorry for the long delay between releases. I’ve been really busy, and I had a major computer hardware failure that has been taking up a lot of my time.  I’ve also been working out some publishing ideas for these deity entries. For these reasons, new entries will be rather sparse for the near future.

Kobolds have always been one of my favorite humanoid races. As such, I really liked working on Kurtulmak. I also wrote this from the point of second edition canon, so you will not find any mentions of Tiamat in this document; nor will you find anything explicitly stating they’re reptiles. I personally do not endorse either of those views, but I wrote this entry to be relatively neutral toward either view. It should be easy enough to use this write-up with either viewpoint.

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